A Perspective on the Past and Future of Investigative Radiology

Currently a visiting professor at the University Hospital Zurich, Val Runge has nearly three decades of experience in the field of radiology. His previous appointments include the Robert and Alma Moreton Centennial Chair in Radiology at Baylor Scott & White Health Care System in Temple, Texas. Val Runge has also written 16 textbooks, with the 17th in preparation, and has published widely in professional journals, including, most recently, the lead article in the 50th anniversary edition of Investigative Radiology.

Val Runge’s article in the 50th anniversary edition of Investigative Radiology (September 2015) is entitled Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography of the Brain—50 years of Innovation, With a Focus on the Future. This article delineates the history of the advances made in the field of brain imaging through computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technologies, together with the impact of these technologies today, and directions for the future.

Written from the author’s personal experience in the field, the article takes note of the progress made in the speed of acquiring images, their sensitivity, and spatial resolution, as well as the successful efforts made to reduce the amount of radiation used in CT scans. In addition to discussing these historical advances, the article also looks at the improvements to the technology expected in the future. These advances range from increased speed to the possibility of simultaneous multi-slice imaging.

For more information, or to access the full article, visit the Investigative Radiology website at journals.lww.com.

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